Why I allow my child to play tackle

UpdatedWednesday January 22, 2020 byNSYFCA.

"I’ve had a lot of friends ask why the hell I would allow [my son] to play tackle. Here’s the thing, and this picture says it all...we are watching the threshold of our little boys becoming young men right before us. On the field they are learning to overcome adversity...who are they when they think they’re too tired and sore to go on? How will they overcome and push through that fatigue and mental wall to keep going for their teammates? The mamas on the sidelines, we’re crossing our own threshold. When we see our boys looking exhausted or if they get banged up in a play and don’t get up right away, our breath catches and we fight the desire to run to them and rock them in our laps. They aren’t our babies on the field. It’s hard work for us all.

Is there risk? Of course. We as a culture have become risk adverse in our parenting. We want to protect our children from all things in a neat and tidy little package. I want my children to experience risk and adversity so that as young adults, they’ve already learned they are stronger than they think. So they know they can overcome the brutality of life. They will know this because they’ve lived it before. Are there many other sports that can teach this so deeply? I think not...not to this degree.

[My son] stepped off the field and as he lifted his helmet, I saw my little baby with his little baby cheeks that I just want to smoosh and kiss. “I was injured, mama.” My heart dropped. “A bee stung my finger in the huddle.” 🤣He kept playing until several plays later [my husband who is also a coach] noticed something was wrong. He sat out for a bit with an ice pack and then begged to get back in the game. [My] boys have a high risk of head trauma playing freely on the boulders in the woods behind our house on the daily. At least here we have protective gear and an outlet!"

 

~Jes Chapman (3rd grade parent)

 

The T-Hawks would like to thank Jes for allowing us to use her facebook post and being a supporter of the tackle program.    As a tackle parent, we all get a bad reputation for allowing our child to play a "dangerous" sport.    The media is scaring families with reports of CTE and banning tackle at a young age.  Concussions and injuries can happen in ANY sport and in ANY activity.    The football our children are learning now is a different game then what athletes 5, 10, 15+ years ago played.    Youth football has come a long way and all we are asking is for parents to keep an open mind and to talk to another tackle football parent.    Open and honest conversations about our sport can clear up a lot of misconceptions and false statements being spread.